UltraWideLife

Islands of Singapore : St John’s and Kusu Island

John’s Island

Situated around 6.5km south of Singapore, St John’s Island is a perfect weekend getaway from Singapore. Have a full day picnic, explore the winding tracks or try catching some fishes, are some of the activities that one can do here. Nearly 39 hectare in size, this island is quite big, left rustic, lush green and can easily explored by foot.

There are no shops here and no option to buy any food or water. So make sure you take everything along. Do not forget to take an umbrella as if it rains a shelter is hard find. A sunscreen can be handy if you plan to spend an entire day here.

Lagoon at St. John's Island

Lagoon at St. John’s Island

Lazarus Island

Lazarus island is connected to St. John’s island via a foot over bridge. Lazarus beach is Singapore’s best kept secret. Trust me this is the best beach in Singapore. Pretty clean as compared to Singapore’s other beaches. Water is transparent and sand is also not black. So if you are looking for good beach in Singapore, this might just be a ray of hope! Somehow I believe this is the only natural beach in Singapore which was not filled for land reclamation or building ferry piers.

Way to Lazarus Beach

Way to Lazarus Beach

Lazarus Beach

Lazarus Beach

How to Reach

Catch a ferry from Marina South Pier to reach St John’s Island.
Adult is charged at 18$ and child at 12$

Ferry to St. John's Island

Ferry to St. John’s Island

Kusu Island

Kusu is one another of the Southern Islands in Singapore, located about 5.6 kilometres to the south of the main island of Singapore. The name Kusu means “Tortoise” or “Turtle” in Chinese; the island is also known as Peak Island or Pulau Tembakul in Malay. From two tiny outcrops on a reef, this island was enlarged and transformed into an island holiday resort of 85,000 square metres today

The island got it’s name when stories passed by the Malays and Chinese in Singapore, citing that a giant tortoise turned itself into an island in order to save two shipwrecked sailors, a Malay and a Chinese near the Singapore waters. The sailors were so grateful to the tortoise that they returned to the island to give thanks. According to their belief, a Muslim kramat and a Taoist Shrine were built on the island. Since then, many other people have continued this tradition of giving thanks and prayers on the eleventh month of the lunar calendar which is also known as the “Kusu” season

Located on Kusu island is the popular Chinese temple – Da Bo Gong 大伯公 or Tua Pek Kong (Grand Uncle). Built in 1923 by a wealthy businessman, the temple houses two main deities – the Da Bo Gong and Guan Yin 观音 (Goddess of Mercy). The former is highly regarded as having the power to confer prosperity, cure diseases, calm the sea and avert danger, while Guan Yin is known as the ‘giver of sons’.

Wishing well at Da Bogong Temple

Wishing well at Da Bogong Temple

Da Bogong Temple

Da Bogong Temple

At the top of the rugged hillock on Kusu Island stands three kramats (or holy shrines of Malay saints) to commemorate a pious man (Syed Abdul Rahman), his mother (Nenek Ghalib) and sister (Puteri Fatimah) who lived in the 19th century. Many devotees will climb the 152 steps leading to the kramats to pray for wealth, good marriage, good health and harmony. The shrines are also popular with childless couples who would pray for children.

The Kusu Kramat

The Kusu Kramat

Perfect sunset point

Perfect sunset point

How to reach

Catch a ferry from Marina South Pier to reach Kusu Island.
Adult is charged at 18$ and child at 12$
Actually its the same ferry that goes to St. John’s Island first. So you can go to St. John’s Island first and then to Kusu Island in single ticket.

You reached the end of post. Did you like it?

%d bloggers like this: